massage and bodywork professionals

a community of practitioners

I want to know what other MTs think on this subject. This question has come up before and I have always said (after I tell them I'd rather they didn't) if you're going to drink, drink after a massage. I recently saw this question come up on FB. Drinking a glass of wine before a massage is okay, right? (my opinion, no) What do you think? Is there an article out there that can support this? I have looked and only found that being intoxicated and having a massage is contraindicated, of course. But what about one drink? and the things that are out there about a glass of red wine being good for you? How true is this? 

 

Your opinions and advice are greatly accepted.

 

Thanks

Views: 20928

Reply to This

Replies to This Discussion

Hey Jacqueline, one again, great topic!

In most instances, it is best to view alcohol as a drug; a depressant drug.

Whatever treatment modifications you use for clients who are on skeletal muscle relaxants would most likely apply if your client ingested alcohol.

In professional arenas, if you plan on having the “no massage if you chose to drink beforehand,” rule, it’s prudent to let your clients know upfront how this situation will be handled so they can make appropriate decision (be proactive rather than reactive). A simple statement during the consent process should do the trick.

Also have a plan of action if you deny an intoxicated client a massage – have a way to get thim or her home safely, such as calling a cab. In these circumstances, many cab companies will provide this service free-of-charge.

In class, this is one of my favorite case studies because folks have passionate views on this subject (usually linked to personal history). I love to ask students to come up with list of objective signs and symptoms of intoxication. Many students state thing such as staggered gait, slurred speech, or slowed response time. When I show them signs and symptoms of Parkinson disease or hypoglycemia, they are shocking similar. The morale here is “don't be too quick to label someone.”
OMG I love the "add it to the consent process" perfect! I am definitly going to do this. I work at a chiropractor and had a client come in and reek of alcohol (this in the am). I immediatly expressed concern wondering if he drank before comming in? he said it was from the night before and was surprised i could tell he had been drinking. I told him I could smell it. I told him the contraindications of having a massage after drinking and i would need to check with the chiropractor to continue. (dr said it was okay since it was hours after and that the body was detoxing) When i went back i told him that i was not comfortable giving him the regular Deep Tissue we normally do and that it would be more stretching and a shorter time. He was free to reschedule if he wanted. He was not upset at me and took my concern seriously. He has not done it again since.

But what do you say to other MTs that think its okay for even one glass of wine? Is it okay? Why or Why not?


Susan G. Salvo said:
Hey Jacqueline, one again, great topic!

In most instances, it is best to view alcohol as a drug; a depressant drug.

Whatever treatment modifications you use for clients who are on skeletal muscle relaxants would most likely apply if your client ingested alcohol.

In professional arenas, if you plan on having the “no massage if you chose to drink beforehand,” rule, it’s prudent to let your clients know upfront how this situation will be handled so they can make appropriate decision (be proactive rather than reactive). A simple statement during the consent process should do the trick.

Also have a plan of action if you deny an intoxicated client a massage – have a way to get thim or her home safely, such as calling a cab. In these circumstances, many cab companies will provide this service free-of-charge.

In class, this is one of my favorite case studies because folks have passionate views on this subject (usually linked to personal history). I love to ask students to come up with list of objective signs and symptoms of intoxication. Many students state thing such as staggered gait, slurred speech, or slowed response time. When I show them signs and symptoms of Parkinson disease or hypoglycemia, they are shocking similar. The morale here is “don't be too quick to label someone.”
In the last year at the Massage Envy I work at we have had 2 active cases of alcohol consumption. One came in drunk and the other came in with a beer in his hand. Both were escorted out of the building. One guy was with his mother who got a massage. I personally know therapists who do serve wine during massage sessions. I do not.
Jacqueline,

I've had a personal experience with receiving a massage and proceeding to have a couple of drinks afterward, and I would not advise it. Massage increased the effects at a much quicker pace, and I actually felt miserable as if I had gone out until the bar closed! As a professional, I would advise people to not consume after a massage. Your client is going to do what he/she wants when the massage is complete and each body responds differently, so we have to educate our visitors. Keeping our clients informed is important, and having personal stories and experiences to share with others is a way for us to protect ourselves and keep our clients safe. I don't think having a glass of wine before or after is bad, but that's it. Just one, because if the alcohol is consumed then that's water that isn't being consumed. It's a balancing act.
FYI--NYS specifically prohibits providing massage to folks under the influence of alcohol....

From NYs regulations: Massage/Bodywork therapists should not treat a patient or client:

•When the therapist or patient/client is in an altered state of cognitive awareness from the use of prescription, and/or over-the-counter medications, alcohol, or other substances, and the patient/client cannot give informed consent and/or the therapist cannot provide appropriate treatment. Consent for the patient/client may be given by guardians and other caregivers when authorized to do so.
•If a patient/client refuses to give the therapist consent to confer with his or her health care practitioner regarding massage/bodywork therapy when such consultation is essential to the patient's/client's health and safety, the therapist should not treat the patient.

Reply to Discussion

RSS

© 2021   Created by ABMP.   Powered by

Badges  |  Report an Issue  |  Terms of Service