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Erik Dalton's Blog (9)

Gym or no Gym for Low Back Pain?

While it could be assumed that people with back pain should not be exercising frequently, a new study by Robert Kell, professor of exercise physiology at the University of Alberta, found that working with weights four days a week provided a significant decrease in the amount of pain and improved quality of life. In the study, groups of 60 men and women with chronic low back pain exercised with weights in two, three or four-day weekly programs, or not at all. Their progress was measured over 16… Continue

Added by Erik Dalton on October 27, 2009 at 7:51am — 9 Comments

Why do so many therapists avoid "belly work"?

I've found many workshop participants are uncomfortable performing hands-on abdominal work, i.e., pelvic and respiratory diaphragm releases and sometimes even superficial belly techniques. This seems particularly true when working with pregnant clients/patients. Do you feel belly-work is under-emphasized in bodywork trainings? Does the area hold too much emotion or possibly too intimate for some? I've written a short e-newsletter & posted a video showing some basic, but useful structural… Continue

Added by Erik Dalton on October 27, 2009 at 7:45am — 24 Comments

What do we mean when we talk of facilitated and inhibited muscles?

Often in workshops and just yesterday on Facebook, I encounter therapists inquiring about the meaning of muscle facilitation and inhibition. Why is this central nervous system process so important to bodyworkers. I'd like to hear what your take is and how you use it in a therapeutic setting.

Added by Erik Dalton on October 4, 2009 at 4:47pm — 38 Comments

Do you avoid basic 'belly-work'...even with pregnant clients?

I've found many workshop participants are uncomfortable performing hands-on abdominal work, i.e., pelvic and respiratory diaphragm releases and sometimes even superficial belly techniques. This seems particularly true when working with pregnant clients/patients.



Do you feel belly-work is under-emphasized in massage trainings? Does the area hold too much emotion or possibly too intimate for some? I've written a short e-newsletter & posted a video showing some basic useful… Continue

Added by Erik Dalton on September 12, 2009 at 11:02am — 21 Comments

Does long distance running damage the knee's cartilage?

Interesting Runner's Knee study that one of my teachers sent me today...what's your experience with this condition?


http://well.blogs.nytimes.com/2009/08/11/phys-ed-can-running-actually-help-your-knees/?em

Added by Erik Dalton on August 17, 2009 at 12:49pm — 8 Comments

Home-Study Conundrum

Here's a topic that's been hotly-debated among many educators. Please join in by visiting my blog at http://massagemag.com/massage-blog/tech-talk/2009/08/14/home-study-conundrum/#comment-514. I've posted some 'teaser' comments by Art Riggs and Tom Myers on this controversial subject. Also check out the insightful comments by Whitney Lowe @ http://www.massagemag.com/News/massage-news.php?id=7523&catid=251&title=home-study-ce-conundrum



Here's a sample of my contribution after… Continue

Added by Erik Dalton on August 14, 2009 at 4:34pm — 54 Comments

Whadda ya think of this?

http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/159212.php

Added by Erik Dalton on August 6, 2009 at 8:02am — 21 Comments

Back Pain & the short right leg syndrome

An exceptionally significant postural issue begging for a logical explanation is the ‘short right leg syndrome’. Although an inferred awareness of right-sided limb length shortness has existed for thousands of years with decades of published research available, no one has yet to produce a universally acceptable answer to these two basic questions:



1. Why the unusual frequency of short right legs seen in clinic?



2. How does this common limb length discrepancy relate to… Continue

Added by Erik Dalton on July 14, 2009 at 10:33am — 17 Comments

Plantar Fasciitis...arch too high or too low?

Many of us tend to blame plantar fasciitis on pronated or pes planus feet but what about clients with a high rigid arch, i.e., supinated or pes cavus foot? Although prolonged duration of pronation is thought to be the most common mechanical cause of structural strain resulting in plantar fasciitis, I’ve found that a pes cavus foot places as much or more strain on the plantar aponeuroses and peroneals and can be much harder to fix. Loss of flexibility in the stirrup spring system causes the foot… Continue

Added by Erik Dalton on July 7, 2009 at 9:30pm — 18 Comments

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