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Research is proving that Acupuncture is Curing Chronic Sinus Congestion.

See details at http://www.healthcmi.com

 

And according to the World Health Organization (WHO), acupuncture is a safe and effective treatment for the following conditions:

  1. Lungs - Some bronchial asthmas.
  2. Ears, Nose, and Throat - Toothaches, pain after tooth extraction, ear aches, sinus inflammation, nasal inflammation or dryness.
  3. Eyes - Central retina and conjunctiva inflammation, nearsightedness (in children), and some cataracts.
  4. Stomach and Intestines - Digestive tract problems, hiccups, inflammation of the stomach, chronic duodenal ulcers, inflammation of the colon, constipation, diarrhea, dysentery caused by certain bacteria.
  5. Nerves - Headaches, migraines, some facial paralyses and nerve pain, post-stroke weakness, nerve ending inflammation, and sciatica.
  6. Muscles - Tennis elbow, frozen shoulder, lower back pain, osteoarthritis, knee pain, sprains and strains.
  7. Miscellaneous - Incontinence (including bed wetting) and many gynecological problems.

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So nothing "Doc" or anyone else says is going to change that.

 

Right, so we've got your position on that.  Your mind is made up and you will not change it.

 

The thing we don't get is when you then follow it up with some call for research or for more research.  There is no point in doing research if your mind cannot be changed.  We've pointed this out many times, but you keep ignoring it.

 

If it doesn't do this for one other individual it doesn't change the fact it did for me. I lived with these pains for over 20 years and in one session, that was six years ago, I was and AM painfree!

 

That's awesome, seriously.  However it happened, I'm psyched that your pain is gone.

 

So yes I am bias. The same way "Doc" comes to the table not accepting because of his knowledge that it can't help. He is not open either.

 

No, now that I must object to.  First off, I *am* willing to change my mind about even things I consider to be very implausible, if I'm presented with compelling evidence.  (But, extraordinary claims require extraordinary evidence.) 

 

Further, I'm not entirely doubtful when it comes to acupuncture.  It's plausible to me that acupuncture could have some of the benefits that have been claimed for it.  For example, it may reduce pain by means of counterirritation, by promoting endorphin production, or by promoting a trance state similar to hypnosis.  (It's true that I don't think for a minute that it is working by channeling qi or by influencing meridians, and the research that has been done to test the meridian theories is pretty clear about that.)

Ok - I gotta make dinner here.

Me too.  What are you making? 

 

I made a really good pork roast the other day and there is plenty left, so I think we're going to have that over some rice with a side of asparagus.  I'm going to steam the asparagus for just 2-3 minutes, shock it in ice water to stop the cooking and lock in the color, and then toss it in a hot pan with a little butter, salt, slivered almonds, and fresh-squeezed orange juice.  Yum.

What are you making?

 

Spuds.  Of course. (creamed)

Chicken (roasted with fresh Rosemary, the best herb on the planet)

Mixed fresh veggies (steamed)

and some of my unTexany gravy.

followed by some greek yogurt and blueberries for dessert.

 

 

 

Sounds great Vlad.  I agree that Rosemary is a terrific herb, and especially on roast chicken.

 

My wife doesn't like the texture of the sprigs so much, so sometimes I grind it in a mortar with kosher salt.

It does sound great. Talking about chicken and yogurt is making me crave a tandoori-style marinated grilled chicken over pulao. nom nom nom.

Tandoori chicken, also great.  I don't know pulao, though.  I'm going to look that up now.

 

Do you have lots of access to good Indian food where you are, Raven?

Yes, there's lots, some of it very, very good. Even in the grocery there's all sorts of pre-fab Indian food if you don't feel like massive cooking. Nowadays, the national dish of England is chicken tikka masala.

 

Balti cooking, from a particular region of Pakistan (around K2, I believe), is also excellent, and something I had never come across in the States.

 

pulao is pilaf--long-grain/Basmari rice with veg and spices.

I have found that rosemary twigs, esp if they're thicker make great spears for the grill.  I wish I could find a good Indian restaurant here in Salt Lake City.

 

As a licensed MT (11 years) I am finding that I am more and more drawn to finding research to support (or not) claims that were put to me in school.  I am such a newbie at learning to read and understand the whole "research" experience.  But I am finding that it is becoming easier and I am enjoying it more.....it's becoming less cumbersome.  But trying to explain to my fellow MT's....they look at me as if I had just told them to place leeches on their children's forehead.  They'd rather become crash test dummies than change a way of thinking.  They'd rather pluck their eyes out than read a research paper.  It's hard work and too hard to change.  But I think I am a better therapist because I am becoming a more knowledgeable therapist. 

 

I would be very concerned if my rheumatologist told me that my scleroderma and lupus would be much better if I just wore some magnets around my neck.  Yet that is exactly what I was told in school when I was going thru a chemo treatment.  Wearing those magnets did nothing.  When I questioned my instructors, I was given the blame for "not being open."  Is that the kind of therapist I want to be?  No.  My instructors lost credibility with me after that experience.

 

I find these discussions truly educational for a variety of reasons.  When the discourse is open and inviting, some very good points are taken.  But, and I haven't done true research on this, it seems to always end up on a personal level....and not a good one. 

 

So I have a question.....Mike, why do you take things so personal and then go into attack and disrespect mode when someone has an opinion that differs from yours?  Isn't this supposed to be an open forum?  You want others to respect and listen to you, but you don't want to afford them the same luxury???  Just because they (we) have differing opinions???  Really???

 

Hi Choice, maybe its a 10yrs in thing, but like you I have started looking at research as "another branch of information".

The way most research is written I may have to read it 5 or 10 times before I "get it"  (very nearly plucked my eyes out loadsa times:) ) was it worth it ? yes !  but its going to take a long time before MT's chose a research class over learning another  "trendy modality".

 

As Vlad is pointing out being able to tell what's good and bad in research is very important, but I'm not research literate so for me its just good ol common sense, experience and intuition that'll have to do for now.     

Choice Kinchen said:

 

As a licensed MT (11 years) I am finding that I am more and more drawn to finding research to support (or not) claims that were put to me in school.  I am such a newbie at learning to read and understand the whole "research" experience.  But I am finding that it is becoming easier and I am enjoying it more.....it's becoming less cumbersome.  But trying to explain to my fellow MT's....they look at me as if I had just told them to place leeches on their children's forehead.  They'd rather become crash test dummies than change a way of thinking.  They'd rather pluck their eyes out than read a research paper.  It's hard work and too hard to change.  But I think I am a better therapist because I am becoming a more knowledgeable therapist. 

 

 

 

Good for you Stephen.  It is an effort, but I for one am glad to hear you are making it and that you think it's worth it.

 

And, coincidentally, your approach to it (reading things several times if necessary, making the most from it as you gain research literacy, etc.) is almost exactly what I happened to recommend in an interview I did about a month ago.

Hi Christopher, thankyou, I have already read it via vlad's thread.

 

and one day we may also hear you have made the effort to venture into using your hands as a therapist...........even if it keeps you away from MBP "lively debate" for a while:) 

 



Christopher A. Moyer said:

Good for you Stephen.  It is an effort, but I for one am glad to hear you are making it and that you think it's worth it.

 

And, coincidentally, your approach to it (reading things several times if necessary, making the most from it as you gain research literacy, etc.) is almost exactly what I happened to recommend in an interview I did about a month ago.

and one day we may also hear you have made the effort to venture into using your hands as a therapist

 

Probably not!  I want to leave that to folks like you, the pros.

 

I might use a sabbatical some day to get some training in massage, but only out of curiosity and a desire to keep improving my perspective on research.  In the meantime, I always work with experienced massage therapists as much as possible during all aspects of our studies.

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