massage and bodywork professionals

a community of practitioners

I was asked to do Swedish massage on a client who is being treated by another therapist using deep compression and deep tissue for a frozen shoulder.   This treatement has caused pain lasting up to 4 weeks, bruising and swelling. 

I performed a Swedish Massage 36 hours before the client returned for another deep tissue session.  I was not made aware that the client intended to continue with deep tissue work which was causing prolonged pain. 

My questions are: Am I doing this client harm or good? Is there an ethical boundary issue involved here?

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Views: 403

Reply to This

Replies to This Discussion

Gordon,

What exactly do you do for a frozen shoulder?

Each person you work on is  different.  I find all the areas that are really sore , hurt, and tender to palpation.  Then work on eliminating or down grading those tender areas. If you can do that, you get clinical results.  And you dont dig and grind on those nocioceptive(panful) areas in such a way that its painful for the client and cause even more tissue damage. Number one rule.. Never hurt the client.  Its better to be ineffective then to hurt the client.  

check out   www.triggerpoints.net    

Gordon J. Wallis said:

Each person you work on is  different.  I find all the areas that are really sore , hurt, and tender to palpation.  Then work on eliminating or down grading those tender areas. If you can do that, you get clinical results.  And you dont dig and grind on those nocioceptive(panful) areas in such a way that its painful for the client and cause even more tissue damage. Number one rule.. Never hurt the client.  Its better to be ineffective then to hurt the client.  

Gordon,

Thanks for thsi site!

I tried to interest my client in this manual, written by a 60-year-old with a frozen shoulder:

http://www.amazon.com/Trigger-Point-Therapy-Workbook-Self-Treatment...

I do NMT and Trigger Point therapy on people with rotator cuff issues all the time.  It might be uncomfortable but not painful, and it should never leave the client bruised or sore. On a scale of 1-10, it should never get above a 7 (if the client tenses up, it's counter-productive!). The trigger point therapy workbook is a great resource.  You may want to look on YouTube also.

Laura,

Thanks for your response.  How would you differentiate between NMT and NM Re-education?  Is there such a thing as NMR?

What do you think about multiple therapists working on the same client two days apart?

Don't know if this helps or not. I have had problems with my shoulder for 6 months or so. It has caused me to stop doing massage therapy full time. I am back to doing part time and the shoulder is getting better. However I'm pretty sure it's because I have been getting 2-3 massage per week, each from a different therapist, each using a different modality. I personally haven't had any problems because of this. I have been sore as heck sometimes, but after resting, stretching, etc, getting another massage, the soreness has subsided.

Chris, Thank you for your response.  Which modalities were you receiving?
 
Chris Reynolds said:

Don't know if this helps or not. I have had problems with my shoulder for 6 months or so. It has caused me to stop doing massage therapy full time. I am back to doing part time and the shoulder is getting better. However I'm pretty sure it's because I have been getting 2-3 massage per week, each from a different therapist, each using a different modality. I personally haven't had any problems because of this. I have been sore as heck sometimes, but after resting, stretching, etc, getting another massage, the soreness has subsided.

Reply to Discussion

RSS

© 2019   Created by Lara Evans Bracciante.   Powered by

Badges  |  Report an Issue  |  Terms of Service