massage and bodywork professionals

a community of practitioners

http://www.massagetherapy.com/articles/index.php/article_id/236/Research--Massage-Therapy-Part-2

 

http://www.physiobob.com/forum/orthopaedic-physiotherapy/402-pizzo-... check out the answere from physiobase !

 

Are you an instructor in massage therapy ? can you provide a more up to date/easy to understand version?. 

 

If you are a newbie to massage therapy what were you taught about this in massage school?.

 

If you know nothing about the piezoelectric effect it would serve you well to get a grasp of exactly why your massage can have some amazingly magical effects on your clients recovery. :)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Views: 1841

Reply to This

Replies to This Discussion

Thanks, this is very interesting reading. More explanation of what happens when we do what we do. By massage strokes referred to in the article, do we assume they mean Swedish? But what type of stroke? It seems in most articles the researchers do not appreciate the wide variety of bodywork modalities.

I don't need research to let me know I am effective but perhaps this type of research can improve efficiency of application. This research seems to support the use of Acupressure for deep injury recovery. It also may support the application of Acupressure over Acupuncture (a long and wide ranging argument). But more specific research is needed.

Hands on healing rules!
http://www.physiobob.com/forum/orthopaedic-physiotherapy/402-pizzo-... check out the answere from physiobase !

In my opinion, the response from "somasimple" is much more accurate in terms of understanding the relevance of piezoelectricity to massage (i.e., virtually none).
To follow up on my previous brief remark (posted as I was headed to class with limited time to spare)...

I was present at the research presentation session back in May at the MTF Seattle conference, where Ross Turchaninov presented his theory about the importance of piezoelectricity in manual therapies and some related ideas. Dr. Turchaninov was a good presenter, but his presentation itself was vigorously criticized by Dr. Langevin, who pointed out that Dr. Turchaninov had presented no data to support this theory, and that the studies he had referenced for support were not relevant to his theory. Dr. Turchaninov disagreed, but I thought Dr. Langevin was correct and had made her points very well. Sadly, limited time prevented further discussion of this matter in the session.

I dont know how many Dr Turchaninov referenced at Seattle but his article does list 17 references.?
From my practical experience with ishemic compression, all I know is I get a much diminished responce using a triggerpoint tool than I do using thumb pressure. I have a draw full of massage tools that I no longer use (never liked them in the first place) clients come to me because I use thumbs/fingers only .........some say they have been hurt by the therapists that use them.

Piezoelectric or not there is something special about effecting tissue release this way:)

Christopher A. Moyer said:
To follow up on my previous brief remark (posted as I was headed to class with limited time to spare)...

I was present at the research presentation session back in May at the MTF Seattle conference, where Ross Turchaninov presented his theory about the importance of piezoelectricity in manual therapies and some related ideas. Dr. Turchaninov was a good presenter, but his presentation itself was vigorously criticized by Dr. Langevin, who pointed out that Dr. Turchaninov had presented no data to support this theory, and that the studies he had referenced for support were not relevant to his theory. Dr. Turchaninov disagreed, but I thought Dr. Langevin was correct and had made her points very well. Sadly, limited time prevented further discussion of this matter in the session.
Peizo effect is taught in Osteopathy, mainly as an effect of 'alignment' of matrix in repair of ligamentous tissues, by stretching during healing phase. Cheers. AJ

Hi Allan can you provide links to any articles or research in the osteopathic field ?.....thanks

Allan J Jones said:
Peizo effect is taught in Osteopathy, mainly as an effect of 'alignment' of matrix in repair of ligamentous tissues, by stretching during healing phase. Cheers. AJ
Thanks, Stephen. So much more research needs done!
Check out the book The Body Electric (author's name escapes me, and I've lent it out!) At any rate, the author is an orthopedic surgeon who began working with the piezoelectric properties of bone tissue and went off from there. Incredible book, and a pretty "easy" read for a volume that is so jam-packed with information.
Has anyone here had any experience with S.C.E.N.A.R. (Self Controlling Energo-Neuro Adaptive Regulation) devices? My understanding is that such devices, which were used in the former USSR for many years, make use of Piezoelectricity for pain relief.

Have you used these devices in your practice? Are these devices within the scope of massage therapy where you practice? Have you noticed positive results?


Daniel Cohen said:
Thanks, this is very interesting reading. More explanation of what happens when we do what we do. By massage strokes referred to in the article, do we assume they mean Swedish? But what type of stroke? It seems in most articles the researchers do not appreciate the wide variety of bodywork modalities.

I don't need research to let me know I am effective but perhaps this type of research can improve efficiency of application. This research seems to support the use of Acupressure for deep injury recovery. It also may support the application of Acupressure over Acupuncture (a long and wide ranging argument). But more specific research is needed.

Hands on healing rules!



The information sounds relevant to rolfing, also. Cool article.

Hi Steve

 

Thank you for e-mail. I am glad that you found www.scienceofmassage.com helpful. In regard to your question about piezoelectricty in the soft tissue and its role in massage therapy. Here are two links to Journal of Massage Science (January/February and March/April issues of 2010) where this issue is discussed in great details with all necessary references, pictures and animations.

http://scienceofmassage.com/dnn/som/journal/1001/therapeutic.aspx

http://scienceofmassage.com/dnn/som/journal/1003/therapeutic.aspx

 

Sincerely  Dr. Ross Turchaninov

 

Reply to Discussion

RSS

© 2022   Created by ABMP.   Powered by

Badges  |  Report an Issue  |  Terms of Service