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Hello,

During my massage school I got in touch with a physical therapist and talked with him about possible employment. I was about to talk more in depth about a job there only I got pregnant and didn't want to start a new job before I had a baby. I told him I will probably be ready to work around spring / summer.
I didn't get back to him because I wasn't ready it's almost September now and just now I'm thinking of starting to do massages.
I also have a job offer from my friends friend in a new Pilates yoga and massage studio and probably will work there in October.
I feel bad about me not getting on touch with that psychical therapist but I don't know what to say!? I think a better fit for me would be to work with yoga place but I also don't want to burn the bridge between me and that therapist.
Any ideas what should I do ??
Should I meet with him ?? But what to say? I want to have a good word out there for possible referrals.
Anybody else was In a situation like that?

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Call and talk to him as a professional. Explain what it is that you are doing. Maybe even see about working part time for the physical therapist. You will learn a lot in that environment about helping people that are in pain, you will also learn what not to do. You may also build clientele faster with the physical therapist. Some states, the physical therapists can charge the massage to insurance as rehabilitative therapy, where as you are not going to get that at the yoga place. I'm sure the Yoga studio is nice and tranquil and you may be flooded with clients as soon as you set up your table.

 Also if you want him to give you referrals, you may want to offer his staff a free massage (or huge discount) to show what you are capable of as far as helping people with injuries or pain, etc.

Uhm, you will make more money working with physical therapists, but you wont learn about taking people out of pain..  I see this almost on a daily basis, monthly for sure.  Year after year after year.  I will qualify what Im saying by saying they are good at rehabing injured people that have lost their limbs, learning how to walk with prosthetics and so on. But people that are hurting. Cant lift their arm without pain. Back pain, Sciatica fibromyalgia and so on.. No Way.

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Thank you for suggestions. I will also add that i am right out of school so I don't have experience with injuries. Yes I have had clients during clinics that I helped to deal with their pain and fell less of it but I haven't use spesific techniques.
I would love to help people that have injuries and know that I would learn a lot there but I also think as a starter would be much easier to do massages at yoga studio. Totally different clientele and more flexible hours because I make my own schedule. So I can work 10 hours a week if I want to and gradually increase it. I don't want to work too much cause my priority is my baby.
I just think its much better fit, but I also don't want to upset that physical therapist since he seemed to like me a lot.
I will try calling and explain why it would be better for me. Do you think I could also say that I would be more than happy to come and do massages once in a while iif he would like me to. ?

You should still contact the PT.  There is no evidence that they could hire you full time, there is no evidence that they could not.  They may be happiest with you only working part time, you won't know until you have a conversation.  Would working for a yoga studio be easier... yes.  And less challenging. You also won't learn 1/10th what you will working with people who are re-hab focused.  I seriously doubt the PT would throw you off the deep end, you would probably be eased in, working with people who need more gentle less, precise work at first, and graduate to more complex work as you learn.  I'd talk to the PT and see what they can offer you. You will get more clients, you will make more money, and you'll have more job satisfaction.  I've been doing the clinical end of massage therapy for 28 years, and there would be no contest.  I understand a child being a primary focus right now, but you may be surprised at what you could work out, and you will never know without having that conversation.  Reason #2. He already thinks you're going to be in touch.  Please, don't be like a too large percentage of therapists who flake out and give the rest of us a bad name.  Being flaky means no referrals. Go have the convo.

Well I haven't thought of full time job anywhere because I want to stay at home with my baby, so I would like to work very little.
I will call that PT and hopefully at least I will leave a good impression.

Dominika, 

I agree that you should be honest and professional about what you are doing and wish for your practice.  You never know where it may lead you.  Ask the PT what the position is and if it is too many hours ask for referrals. Thank them for the opportunity as it may be something to revisit down the line.   Consider givng the PT a sample session so if they like your work, you may not need to work so hard getting the clients you do want. Also if they are looking for help, set up a friend who the position may be a better fit (make sure it is someone up to the task of working in a professional environment). Most PT's are very hard working and fast paced.

I disagree that PT's are not good at pain releif! Any good PT worth their salt will be excellent at pain releif and many other aspects of healing injury and rehab. I think it largely depends upon experience and training, just like any good massage therapist (though most PT's have a Doctorate these days)

Michelle Wald PT, LMT, Certified Aston Kinetics Practitioner.

I would like to say first off. I do respect all of your posts that I have read in the past.

However I do have to disagree with you on this one! Have you ever worked for a physical therapist that actually knew what they were doing?

While serving in Iraq, I volunteered in the Physical Therapy Clinic at the hospital on base doing Massage Therapy. Not only were the Physical Therapy Staff and other Doctors, and Nurses, encouraging of Massage, when ever I had any questions about certain injuries of patients (soldiers, Iraqi women, children) that were recovering from Gun shot wounds, blown off arms, legs, other physical trauma from bomb blasts, etc. The staff were ALWAYS very knowledgeable and helpful in this area. A lot of what I learned there has helped me tremendously in my career as far as helping people that are in pain.

On the same note, yes I have met the one or two PT's that rushed people in and out like cattle. I have also met MT's that are the same way.

Saying that they are all the same is like saying all Massage Therapists, Doctors, Chiropractors, etc are all either good or bad based on their title.
 
Gordon J. Wallis said:

Uhm, you will make more money working with physical therapists, but you wont learn about taking people out of pain..  I see this almost on a daily basis, monthly for sure.  Year after year after year.  I will qualify what Im saying by saying they are good at rehabing injured people that have lost their limbs, learning how to walk with prosthetics and so on. But people that are hurting. Cant lift their arm without pain. Back pain, Sciatica fibromyalgia and so on.. No Way.

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