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i've been using the spray and stretch technique this year with excellent results in myofascial trigger point cases of acute pain, short appointments with multiple muscle group involvement, and stubborn trigger points.

i understand the manufacturer was demonstrating spray and stretch at recent physical and massage therapist conferences. maybe there are others using spray & stretch...

is anyone else using either "instant ice" or "spray & stretch"?
are you finding different results with one product vs. the other?
are you recovering your product costs and how (e.g., increase the rate for everyone, offer upgrade to massage rate, etc.)?

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Hi Jayer, Henry Hardnock talked of his less favourable "tempary at best" experieces with spray stretch on the comment wall a while back.Obviously techniques move on and improve and it sounds like you are extreamly pleased with the results you are getting so can you tell us the way that you learned your method eg book dvd course etc ?
Regards steve
Hi Jaya.
I use Biofreeze to help work out the painful trigger points. It helps with the pain during the treatment and after.

Ken
OM Steve

i missed Henry's posting on the comment wall describing his results as temporary at best. i have used the Travell tapes (which have interesting comments from Dr. Travell that are not in the texts) along with the Travell texts, and Chaitow's CANT for reference. earlier this summer a website http://learnsprayandstretch.org/index/ sponsored by Gebauer (manufacturer) with video clips and other information got started.

i am assuming Henry's comment was not in reference to clients not changing dysfunctional behavior that perpetuate trigger points. i would value knowing more about Henry's results and better understanding his experience... along with everyone else's.
thanks Ken. i also like and use biofreeze. usually biofreeze cryo-spray after the treatment... especially along the occiput, iliac crest and greater trochanter, but any sore spots.

Ken Elwood said:
Hi Jaya.
I use Biofreeze to help work out the painful trigger points. It helps with the pain during the treatment and after.

Ken
i guess this discussion is not going anywhere. i'm a little surprised. i thought there'd be more interest.
I have never tried the spray-and-stretch approach. Seeing Travell demonstrate it on some old videos was very interesting, but her client positioning for some applications (such as psoas) looked like it detracted from the effectiveness of the technique. Spray-and-stretch is a neurological approach that requires little/no direct pressure, and it proves that smashing away at tender and "trigger" points isn't necessary to get results.

I have found positional release to be a highly effective approach to painlessly resolving many trigger/tender points in a short time. It is also a neurological approach to soft tissue manipulation that holds much promise for MTs that are tired of hurting themselves and their clients unnecessarily.
Jaya,

I just noticed this post -- a little late apparently!

The spray and stretch technique is an amazing way of working with myofascial trigger points, spasm, and joint sprains. There is so much to this technique to which not many therapists are aware. For instance, the technique was based on the works of Dr. Hans Kraus, a Austrian orthopedic surgeon who moved to the US and practiced in NYC for the remainder of his life. Dr. Kraus also worked with President Kennedy among many other celebrities.

I have been using vapocoolants sprays for about 7 years and have found great results. I see several people here saying their use of Biofreeze works well and while I agree, I can say it is not the same effect. Though the two products are different, they work in a complimentary fashion. A vapocoolant works through evaporation and drop the temperature of the skin to about 8 degrees F instantly. This sends and immediate barrage of signal to the CNS, thus interrupting the pain signal which travels to the CNS on slower conducting nerve fibers. This creates a window of opportunity to move the tissue through normal, pain free range of motion. It is the motion without pain that is the therapeutic intervention -- the spray only allows it to happen. Travell and Simons said, "stretch is the action, spray is the distraction". Biofreeze works by stimulating the cold receptors, thus having a similar effect on the CNS, but usually not enough to move the tissue through pain free ROM. The difference between the 2 is that a vapocoolant is instantly acting with short duration (about 1 minute) and Biofreeze is delayed action, but long duration. The two go hand and hand by using the vapocoolant first in conjunction with the spray and stretch technique, then applying Biofreeze, which carries the counter-irritant effect for a longer duration.

Even the makers of Biofreeze (Hygenic Corp. Akron, OH) agree with this by providing Biofreeze samples and information at courses where the spray and stretch technique is taught.

If anyone else is interested in more information, I would love to help provide it. For those of you who are looking to increase your clinical reach -- using a vapocoolant will help you tremendously. You will need training -- it is not a 'monkey see, monkey do' technique. It is a very tactile learning experience.

To account for cost in my practice, I bill the client an additional $3-5 for the use of spray. I get very few complaints. I have heard of others building it into the cost of the session or charging for the entire unit and holding it for the client.

HI Jeffrey - I am currently taking NMT in school and very interested in the Spray and Stretch technique.  I'd like to try this on my case study subject but have really only found BioFreeze readily available.  Where can I find the other kind of coolant spray?  I heard one type is not available as it's in high demand at military hospitals right now.

Jeffrey A. Lutz said:

Jaya,

I just noticed this post -- a little late apparently!

The spray and stretch technique is an amazing way of working with myofascial trigger points, spasm, and joint sprains. There is so much to this technique to which not many therapists are aware. For instance, the technique was based on the works of Dr. Hans Kraus, a Austrian orthopedic surgeon who moved to the US and practiced in NYC for the remainder of his life. Dr. Kraus also worked with President Kennedy among many other celebrities.

I have been using vapocoolants sprays for about 7 years and have found great results. I see several people here saying their use of Biofreeze works well and while I agree, I can say it is not the same effect. Though the two products are different, they work in a complimentary fashion. A vapocoolant works through evaporation and drop the temperature of the skin to about 8 degrees F instantly. This sends and immediate barrage of signal to the CNS, thus interrupting the pain signal which travels to the CNS on slower conducting nerve fibers. This creates a window of opportunity to move the tissue through normal, pain free range of motion. It is the motion without pain that is the therapeutic intervention -- the spray only allows it to happen. Travell and Simons said, "stretch is the action, spray is the distraction". Biofreeze works by stimulating the cold receptors, thus having a similar effect on the CNS, but usually not enough to move the tissue through pain free ROM. The difference between the 2 is that a vapocoolant is instantly acting with short duration (about 1 minute) and Biofreeze is delayed action, but long duration. The two go hand and hand by using the vapocoolant first in conjunction with the spray and stretch technique, then applying Biofreeze, which carries the counter-irritant effect for a longer duration.

Even the makers of Biofreeze (Hygenic Corp. Akron, OH) agree with this by providing Biofreeze samples and information at courses where the spray and stretch technique is taught.

If anyone else is interested in more information, I would love to help provide it. For those of you who are looking to increase your clinical reach -- using a vapocoolant will help you tremendously. You will need training -- it is not a 'monkey see, monkey do' technique. It is a very tactile learning experience.

To account for cost in my practice, I bill the client an additional $3-5 for the use of spray. I get very few complaints. I have heard of others building it into the cost of the session or charging for the entire unit and holding it for the client.

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